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The 5 Danish designers that are rewriting Scandi style (and you need to add to your wardrobe ASAP)

They're rewriting the Scandi-style rule book…

08 Apr 2019

Famed for their considered curation of everything from furniture to fashion, Scandinavia has long been a destination for cool design. But until recently, the mood that probably sprung to mind was minimal. When you think of the ultimate Scandi-style outfit, it would be a melange of neutrals, grey tones and monochrome, right? Simple and natural… Certainly NOT an eclectic mix of rainbow brights and quirky colour clashes.

But since Copenhagen fashion week became a must-visit stop on the biannual fashion show circuit, all eyes have been on Denmark’s fresh take on Scandi style. Instead of those pared back neutrals, the new wave of Danish designers mix print and colour in combinations you never thought would work. And with their laid-back mood (you’ll often see Danish girls at CPFW teaming a mismatched print tea dress with beaten up sneakers and a beanie), the Copenhagen look is one that will be easy to emulate this festival season AND one we want it in our wardrobes. Now. Please. Thank you.

These are the five brands rewriting the Scandi-style rule book…

STINE GOYA

Mixing a design eduction from London’s legendary Central St Martin’s college with her native Copenhagen cool, Stine Goya is causing a stir with her eponymous label’s signature print clashes, sherbet-bright colours and rich fabrics. The brand’s pop-up shop at Selfridges has been so successful the original six week run has been extended until May, meaning there is more time to shop the delicious designs. “Danish style is chilled,” Stine told GLAMOUR at the all pink-painted pop-up. “There are beers before the show and people arrive on bicycles.” Sounds like our kind of fashion week. Instead of styling the beautiful silk dresses with heels and a clutch bag, Copenhagen’s cool girls are more likely to wear a bucket hat and sneakers - which is much more aligned to the eccentric style Britain is known for too. Our favourite piece? The exclusive Miki quilted jacket, in sky blue and ideal for Spring.

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ROTATE

GLAMOUR flagged this fledgling label last year, when they launched on net-a-porter.com and this season’s collection is bigger and better. Known for oversized sleeves and glamorous Eighties-style cocktail dresses - many of which come in eye-popping pink - Rotate was founded by uber cool Copenhagen-based stylists and influencers Jeanette Friis Madsen and Thora Valdimars, who often clash their outfits in colour combos we could only dream of.

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GANNI

Ok, this isn’t the newest label of the Danish designers but it's the one that bought focus onto the new way of dressing. Their printed midi-skirts have become a cult item and cemented the floaty skirt / sneaker and sweatshirt as our go-to outfit while every season they nail the must-have shoes (for Spring it’s a cowboy boot and chunky trainer.) Worn by everyone from Alexa, Kendall and Rihanna the hashtag #GANNIgirls provides endless hours of styling inspiration and ideas.

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CECILIE BAHNSEN

With her focus on frills, contemporary femininity and oversized silhouettes, this former assistant at Erdem makes dresses to dream in. Infused with romance and whimsy, while Bahnsen’s palette has more in common with traditional Scandi style with it’s mainly monochrome hues, the textures (artisanal lace, quilting, lame and organza) are anything but old school.

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GESTUZ

One of the oldest Danish brands on the scene, Gestuz has a way with colour like no other. At a preview of the upcoming Autumn collection the palette focused on pumpkin spice mixed with emerald green. Talking of green, we are also big fans of the brand’s sustainability initiatives - using polyester made from recycled plastic bottles and organic cotton (which has lower environmental impact) and restricting the chemicals that are used in the manufacturing process (therefore protecting the health of producers of the clothes) as well as banning fur and angora from their collections.

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